ncsss-2017-conference-logo dates
     

Sessions

The agenda is updated as sessions are confirmed with speakers. Check back often for session updates!

Thursday, November 2
9:00 am - 10:00 am

Keynote Speaker

Location TBD
10:00 am - 10:50 am

STEM Summer Camps as a Recruitment Tool

Introduce students to STEM and your program at the same time! The Kansas Academy of Mathematics & Science use summer camps to expose students to STEM disciplines at a young age with the hope they will consider attending KAMS in the future. This education session will share with you the framework and strategy in using summer camps. Assessment data from the KAMS summer camps will be shared and discussed. Let your summer camp be the start of a student’s lifelong journey in STEM.

Presenters:
Regina Tolbert
Roger Schieferecke

Administration
 

The "How's and Why's" of Onsite Student Research:  Creating Opportunities for All Students Through Research Class

Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology’s Research Department excels at helping students develop, plan, and execute competitive research projects all within the on-campus environment. This approach allows a large number of students from diverse backgrounds to succeed in a variety of research competitions and effectively differentiate themselves during the college application process. This presentation will explore how the supporting administrations and the research teachers work together to make “in house” research successful.

Presenters:
Scott Bolen
Jennifer Kinsey

Administration
 

Bring Authenticity to your Coding Program

Explore MobileMakersEdu curricular and professional development programs in the growing field of coding. Created around experiential learning, authentic real-world skills, and connections to the developer community, the program drives student engagement and re-energizes teachers.

Presenter:
Jessi Chartier

Computer Science
 

Process Over Product - Using Google Docs to Encourage Experimentation, Failure and Brilliance

Professional writers live by the maxim "first word, worst word." One starts with nonsensical garbage (hopefully with a nugget of potential) and nurtures it to something clean and shiny. But students and sometimes their teachers think more along the lines of "one and done," expecting a refined product on the first draft. This session will present ways to encourage sloppy drafts and reward change rather than set unattainable goals of perfection that will deepen appreciation of the writing process for students and teachers alike.

Presenter:
Richard K. Weems

Humanities
 

Teaching Mathematics through Distance Education

In this session, we will discuss techniques and best practices in teaching mathematics in non-traditional, virtual classroom environments. We will address designing and teaching online courses, courses offered through real-time videoconference, and those delivered in a hybrid, or blended, classroom environment. Examples from courses taught at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM), including Precalculus, Applied Finite Mathematics, and Single and Multivariable Calculus, will be presented and provide context for participants to discuss.

Presenter:
Tamar Avineri

Math
 

Developing a Course Focused on Biological Problems in Contemporary Society: Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Connections, Differentiation, and Integration of Technology

Educators will have the opportunity to learn about development of a topics oriented upper level biology course. Experiences in course establishment, recruiting students, incorporating reputable resources, as well as developing original activities and projects will be discussed. Objectives of the course, their applications to problems faced in scientific research and society at large, as well as ways in which the class can be tailored to student interests and talents will be incorporated. Opportunities for modification over time to introduce responsible use of new technologies will be demonstrated. Examples of differentiation for gifted learners and example student products will be shared.

Presenter:
Rebecca Phillips

Science and Engineering
 

Student Support in STEM Schools

This session is designed to generate dialogue regarding methods to support students in STEM schools. In a diverse society, multiple measures are required to offer support for the needs of individual of learners. The rigor and demands of STEM schools accompany high levels of stress and adaptation for high school students. This roundtable will address questions concerning support offering for students with diverse needs. Specific support discussion areas include varying levels of academic strengths in advanced courses, preparation for high stakes exams, academic achievement, leadership, meeting developmental needs, differentiation, cultural responsiveness, organization, and stress management.

Presenter:
Dr. Lynette Clark

Wellness
11:00 am - 11:50 am

Calling All Future Scientists and Engineers!

Recruiting is the life blood of our school. It's our first opportunity to share the unique programs and opportunities that make our campus thrive. Here at John Jay Science & Engineering Academy, recruiting is a yearlong effort. From elementary outreach, to middle school science fair judging, we are always finding ways to promote our school and attract potential candidates. During our presentation, you will learn about our comprehensive recruiting program and how we consistently attract a diverse population of students who have a passion for Science and the perseverance to achieve high academic success.

Presenter:
Gretchen Bley
Crystal Mitchell

Administration
 

Cross Curricular Project Based Learning - Physics and Computers Science

Cross Curricular Project Based Learning – Angry Robots! Using PBL and computer science to enhance the understanding of physics and computer science concepts. In this session we will review our projects, provide them in word format and lead the attendees to sketch out their own cross curricular project.

Presenters:
John Chapin
Jacob Voetberg

Computer Science
 

Before Bob Dylan: Poets and Agitators in Popular American Music

As teachers of history and literature, we ask students to read and to think critically about the past, the present, and their own lives. Bob Dylan’s receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature has led me to realize that I should help my students listen critically as well. All students listen to music, certainly more than they read, so I weave threads of music history into my class to help them understand the roles music has played in shaping American society and to provide a context for current music. Please join me in discussing popular American music as history and literature.

Presenter:
John Woodmansee

Humanities
 

Standards Based Grading in the STEM Classroom

Now in it’s fourth year of implementation at NCSSM, our Standards Based Grading approach for assessment in Pre-Calculus and Calculus continues to evolve. Come hear what SBG is all about, how it has worked in our courses, and how you can get started in your own classroom. This talk is appropriate for all administrators and teachers, not only for those of STEM fields. Sample standards and assessments will be provided for math, science, and language courses.

Presenter:
Taylor Gibson

Math
 

Building STEM Confidence and Capacity in Girls

Retention of girls in high school STEM classes leading to STEM careers is challenging. iBio Educate Center has designed the Stellar Girls middle-school program to build self-efficacy and STEM skills for girls. Wheeling High School uses this program as a mentorship model for high school girls and their middle school counterparts to provide a hands-on science/engineering experience in a girls-only environment. The program has built leadership capacity, boosted skill confidence and increased academic persistence in both the high school and middle school participants. The mentorship model provides
social reinforcement to consider science and engineering a viable option for the future.

Presenter:
Kathy Konyar

Science and Engineering
 

The Grand Challenges of K-12 Engineering Education in the 21st Century

In 2015 college engineering deans from around the US made a commitment to educate the next generation of engineers to meet the Grand Challenges of Engineering for the 21st century. This preparation does not have to start with college—it can start at the K-12 level. Come and engage in discussion on how to develop K-12 traditional and virtual engineering programs.

Presenter:
Ershela L. Sims, PhD

Science and Engineering
 

A Model for Improving Wellness and School Climate: Results from BCA’s Pioneering
Wellness Initiative

This presentation gives an overview of the outcomes/lessons from an innovative wellness pilot program run at Bergen County Academies that improved the well-being of all participants. Students reported many benefits, including increased self-esteem, greater ability to cope with set-backs, express empathy, manage difficult feelings, make friends, engage in healthy behaviors, and manage stress. The program trained juniors in the fall trimester as peer wellness coaches. Coaches then taught a formal

Presenter:
Deborah Teplow

Wellness
2:00 pm - 2:50 pm

Reach Outside the Classroom and Impact Your State

Since its inception, the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science has focused on outreach activities for the two-fold purpose of impacting education across the state while simultaneously promoting MSMS to prospective students. This presentation will focus on some of MSMS’ most successful outreach activities that could be easily implemented at other NCSSS schools. Attendees will also be encouraged to share effective outreach activities their schools have implemented.

Presenter:
Rick Smith

Administration
 

Pathways of Experience: The Evolution of the Senior Capstone Program at GSMST

This presentation will discuss the new three-pronged pathway approach that GSMST has developed to offer internship opportunities in the age of differentiated instruction. The evolution of our Senior Capstone Experience program will be discussed to show the growth of the program. A description and discussion of the resultant Pathways of the "Thinker," the "Doer," and the "Maker" as the solution to the problem of lack of student choice within blanket one-size-fits-all internship programs will be provided to express the value offered by this program and how others may be able to develop a similar program to fit their needs.

Presenter:
Kerri Napoleon, Ph.D.

Administration
 

Tracking STEM Degree Completion Among Graduates: Using Data from the National Student Clearinghouse

Over the past four years, the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) has been using data from the National Student Clearinghouse, a college enrollment and degree verification service, to track graduates into and through their postsecondary education pursuits. In addition to tracking postsecondary persistence, NCSSM has also used data from the Clearinghouse to track which graduates complete STEM postsecondary degrees and what degrees they complete. Session presenters will discuss what postsecondary data is available from the Clearinghouse, how they are using the data to track STEM degree completion among graduates, and what they have found through their analyses.

Presenter:
Todd Roberts

Administration
 

The Scientific Narrative: Using Creative Writing to Craft Compelling Research Papers

All STEM students write research papers, but, despite the multitude of genres available to student writers, almost all of their research papers are written in nonfictional prose. Different students do their best writing in different genres; if we want to see our students’ best written work, we should allow them to experiment with the genres in which they write—even when writing research papers. Participants will read and discuss student research papers written in a variety of genres, learning about the theory, research, structure, and benefits of alternative-genre research papers.

Presenter:
Mike Miller

Humanities
 

The Mathematics Classroom: Group Work vs. Working in Groups

How many times have we heard from colleagues and students, “groups in math class don’t work”! Over the years, my response has developed into a question: “do you mean working in groups or simply sitting in groups and working?” I have been successfully using group work for nearly 30 years to take advantage of peer sharing and guided instruction.  In addition to encouraging conference participants to share thoughts and questions, I will share tips for a successful classroom and sample group activities. I will also share research supporting the effectiveness of group work in the classroom.

Presenter:
Donita Robinson

Math
 

Mentors for a Minute -how students can successfully engage scientists for advice

For several years, I have had my research students email their research proposals to 2 scientists whose work was cited in the student proposal and ask the scientist for advice (hopefully specifically on something that was not clear). The interaction between scientists has proven so valuable in supporting students with resources, technical advice, and substantial validation and encouragement. All students have obtained at least one reply! I can share the training I provide my students for this assignment and some of the outcomes!

Presenter:
Andrea Cobb, Ph.D.

Science and Engineering
 

Promoting and Modeling Work-Life Balance

Technology has made this easier for employees working at consortium schools. While staying connected has some advantages, and is sometimes necessary, it can also be argued that this constant connection is not healthy for the employee and does not set a good example for the students that we work with. How do consortium schools recognize the importance of employee work/life balance and encourage employees to achieve balance integrate work and life? This roundtable conversation will provide an opportunity for participants to unplug and discuss how we find, promote, and model work life balance.

Presenters:
Terry Lynch

Wellness
3:00 pm - 3:50 pm

Community STEAM Outreach: The Bergen County Experience

This presentation will share lessons learned from over twenty years of providing STEAM outreach programs to elementary students, middle school students, and adults from Bergen County, New Jersey and nearby communities. In addition, the presentation will explore new developments and open a discussion where participants can share ideas and reflections about STEAM outreach. The goals of this presentation are to provide a framework to map out the potentials of STEAM outreach programs, to inspire and help to guide new STEAM outreach efforts, and to develop and encourage networking among people interested in sharing ideas and promoting these programs.

Presenters:
Ken Mayers
Mark Tronicke

Administration
 

Aquaponics – We built it!  Now what?

Project based learning has the unintended consequence of leaving completed projects behind. Large scale capital projects, such as the construction of a closed aquaponic system, pose an even greater issue. How can a school integrate a large-scale project into existing curricula,and still meet the educational and testing needs of the student body? This session will focus on the logistical and staff issues necessary to extend the usefulness and agency of a large-scale capital project.

Presenters:
William Wolfe
Josh Headley
Dr. Dwight Smith
Mr. Jeffrey Reeser

Administration
 

Sprint to STEM Success: Combine the Agile Design Process for Project Success

Assisting our students in becoming innovative thinkers and creators is paramount. In STEM at North County High School, we believe that experience is the best teacher! In our unique Community Challenge course, students, nonprofits and for profit companies work alongside one another. By transforming the traditional classroom to a solution creation center we bring authentic learning to life! Our nonprofit partners consult with our students with a business-based issue. Using the Agile Design Process a student team, with a business member as a mentor devise and propose the best possible solution for the “client.”

Presenter:
William Forrester

Computer Science
 

Analytical Writing for STEM Students

Writing is the medium for lasting and deep professional discourse; however, students tend to associate writing solely with English class, and not transfer the skill effectively to their other disciplines. High school history, when taught to inculcate the analytical thinking and writing skills necessary for professional success, incorporates writing instruction and usage that equips students to write well in any discipline. With this combination, students get rigorous writing instruction, plus the experience of writing non-fiction in expository and persuasive styles. Consequently, students receive a relentless message that solid writing is a necessary skill not tied to any particular discipline.

Presenters:
Jill Burdick-Zupancic, Monte F. Bourjaily, IV

Humanities
 

Using Geogebra to teach Multivariable Calculus

Geogebra is a free dynamic math software that can be used to create interactive animations of mathematical ideas. By demonstrating a series of activities I’ve designed to teach my Multivariable Calculus students about curves and paths in R^3, I will highlight several features of Geogebra that make it a particularly valuable tool for teaching PreCalculus, Calculus,
and Multivariable Calculus.

Presenter:
Sarah Harrelson

Math
 

Adventures with Electronic Student Lab Notebooks

How can we increase the learning value from science student notebooks? Science students engage in the authentic practice of keeping research notebooks to organize their workflow, handle materials safely, follow protocols, document progress, showcase their hard earned data analysis, problem solve, obtain feedback on thinking, (and for grades) . What advantages do electronic notebooks offer? Drawbacks? This session documents our first year of electronic notebook use with senior researchers and electives students and why our students protested when we suggested returning to traditional paper notebooks. See student samples, ask questions and share your experiences with electronic or traditional science notebooks!

Presenter:
Andrea Cobb, Ph.D.

Science and Engineering
 

Thriving: Connecting Academic and Social Skills to Promote Leadership Development Among Gifted Students

Leadership development in gifted students is important to their educational experiences, decision making, and overall social development. In most institutions with a gifted student population, the idea of leadership development is an abstract thought. Often times leadership is correlated with giftedness and academic success. This correlation may lead to a lack of understanding of leadership and a lack of opportunities for leadership development. The implications are poor decision making by student leaders a lack of commitment from our student leaders and possible removal from the position. The purpose of this session is to discuss leadership development opportunities that can assist students in their positive leadership behavior and journey.

Presenter:
Cathy Thomas

Wellness
Friday, November 3
9:00 am - 9:50 am

PD for all: Building the capacity of your teaching staff

Building the capacity of all teachers is important to school improvement. Learn how to create a professional development plan to impact the learning of and incorporate the voices of your entire staff, while also helping your PLC structure to thrive. We will specifically focus on how our PD structure helped teachers to grow professionally but also furthered our STEM and college and career readiness initiatives in our diverse, comprehensive high school. Also, we will discuss how to empower teacher leaders to be partners in the leading of this professional development.

Presenters:
Rebecca Kinnee, Chris Rugg

Administration
 

Coding Arkansas' Future with Apps for Good

This session details how ASMSA has leveraged Apps for Good to strengthen our Computer Science outreach program, connecting us with teachers and students we otherwise might have missed. Apps for Good is a global community of over 1,500 educators empowering a generation to change their world through technology.

Presenters:
Daniel Moix
Denise Gregory

Computer Science
 

Piling Good Things: Using Science Fiction and Fantasy to Enhance Empathy

Empathic understanding is critical for developing positive social relationships in youth, so how can school officials facilitate this growth in a manner that is appealing to students? One way would be by using relatable works of science fiction and fantasy that they regularly consume. Join us to discuss such works as Doctor Who, Star Trek, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Twilight Zone, Quantum Leap, and others and how they can help enhance empathy in your students. Whether you prefer to beam up or roam cemeteries late at night, you are sure to have a good time learning applicable skills!

Presenter:
Heath Stevens

Humanities
 

Science Meets Humanities: Researching & Communicating Today’s Science

This session will demonstrate how English/humanities classes can collaborate with science and library partners to produce meaningful student science essays and audiovisual products. We will discuss how to scaffold student research in cutting-edge science and incorporate student chemistry lab experiences into compelling science narratives. From purposeful research to focused persuasive writing to symposium product, this session will discuss how you can offer your students a meaningful opportunity to investigate and communicate innovative STEM ideas with professionals and peers.

Presenters:
Jennifer Seavey, Anne Applin

Humanities
 

Games in Mathematics

I will talk about ways in which I have used traditional games (bingo, tic-tac-toe, Jeopardy, etc) to help students review material and practice difficult mathematical concepts. I will also talk about certain games that can be used to teach mathematical principles including ideas from Abstract Algebra and combinatorics.

Presenter:
Nicole Kroeger

Math
 

The Inner Light: The Great AmericanTotal Solar Eclipse of 2017

The great American total solar eclipse of August 21, 2017 presented both the secondary academic community as well as the general public with the greatest and most widespread appeal to STEM interfacing and empowerment with overall and overarching national educational standards and aspirations. The following presentation will detail one such expedition, outreaching to a small community in western Nebraska and outline the steps in directing new frontiers for today’s secondary school boys and girls based upon astronomical objectives. The opportunity to kindle commitment to long term investment in experimental science will highlight the presentation.

Presenter:
Lawrence Berz

Science and Engineering
 

Do Your Students Matter?

The central component of mattering is the students’ perceptions that they are important, significant, and of concern to another individual, an organization, or the world. These perceptions play a role in the persistence and retention of students and more importantly, their overall well-being. Research has shown that students who believe they matter to their institution are more motivated to learn. What are you doing to make sure your students know they matter?

Presenters:
Roger Schieferecke
Regina Tolbert

Wellness
10:00 am - 10:50 am

State Supported Residential STEM: Similarities & Differences (Part 1)

This session is the result of a Mini-term research project that looks as the similarities and differences among state supported residential programs. During the hands-on portion of the session, we hope to gather additional data and insights on each of our residential campuses and to advance the proposed development of a student leadership role where representatives from across all residential campuses participate in monthly virtual training sessions hosted by each campus and a yearly student summit where representatives explore common challenges or issues facing state supported residential communities and develop sustainable approaches to meeting them.

Presenters:
Letita R. Mason, Akelo Agingu

Administration
 

It's Gettin' HOTT in Here: Promoting Higher Order Thinking with Technology

There’s no doubt that technology engages our students, but are they cognitively engaged? In this session, participants will learn about technology based classroom activities that allow students to connect with content in meaningful ways while remaining motivated and engaged. Participants will actively work through a framework that aides in designing lessons that culminate in HOTT (Higher Order Thinking w/ Technology) activities. We will also discuss ways in which teachers can utilize technology to facilitate classroom discussion around student work to further promote higher order thinking and deepen understanding of concepts.

Presenter:
Becky Shiring

Computer Science
 

Creative Thinking as Critical Thinking (Part 1)

With a focus on the interrogation of situations in order to create and resolve problems, along with the use of structural tools from fields like logic and cartography, a creative writing course can also be a course in critical thinking. STEM students benefit in multiple ways: the ability to construct and dismantle scenarios translates into math, engineering and science research courses, and the ability to explore and develop identity builds confidence and compassion - necessary tools for innovation.

Presenter:
Dr. Nicole Sarrocco

Humanities
 

Puzzlepalooza: An interactive look at engaging students in learning through puzzles (Part 1)

Are you looking for ways to engage gifted learners? Puzzle hunts provide an opportunity for students to work on problems where solutions or even directions are not immediately evident. The “Puzzle Lords” of Montgomery Blair HS will share their successes and challenges from the eight years of Blair Puzzlepalooza. This will be a hands-on session in which participants will have the opportunity to dive into sample puzzles and work collaboratively on a truly out-of-the-box intellectually stimulating activity.

Presenters:
James Schafer, David Stein, Peter Ostrander & Peter Hammond

Math
 

Flipping Pieces - How to Build Successful Tech-Flipped Activities and Lessons (Part 1)

The research is in … Students enjoy using technology to engage in learning activities both inside and outside the classroom. Using technology successfully to flip classroom instruction does not have to be an all or nothing proposition. Current research suggests that using video micro lectures to offload instruction through homework or out-of-class activities can provide more time in class for student-centered activities, investigations, and the construction of knowledge – “Off-loading instruction” to promote “construction.” Video micro lectures are also a good way to accelerate, differentiate, and to provide open-ended investigations of challenging concepts for our students.

Presenter:
Laura C. McConaughey

Math
 

STEM Innovation & Entrepreneurship Go Hand in Hand (Part 1)

Innovation and entrepreneurship are joined in this interactive and collaborative workshop which focuses on how to turn students’ innovative ideas into entrepreneurial actions. Participants will be given a real problem in the market to solve and work together to create a marketable STEM based solution. Get ready for a fast paced exercise in brainstorming, problem solving, collaboration and out of the box thinking. Your solution will be pitched to our sharks and may the best STEM product win!

Presenters:
Laura Boyd Smidt
Kathryn Cossa

Science and Engineering
 

The Neuroscience of Mindfulness: How to Encourage Wellness on Your Campus

In this session, participants will learn: The definition of Mindfulness, neurophysiological underpinnings of Mindfulness and learning, practical classroom applications of Mindfulness via experiential learning, and how to create mindful spaces on campus.

Presenters:
Meagan Butler, M.Ed.
Marissa Rivera, M.A., LPC

Wellness
11:00 am - 11:50 am

State Supported Residential STEM: Similarities & Differences (Part 2)

This session is the result of a Mini-term research project that looks as the similarities and differences among state supported residential programs. During the hands-on portion of the session, we hope to gather additional data and insights on each of our residential campuses and to advance the proposed development of a student leadership role where representatives from across all residential campuses participate in monthly virtual training sessions hosted by each campus and a yearly student summit where representatives explore common challenges or issues facing state supported residential communities and develop sustainable approaches to meeting them.

Presenters:
Letita R. Mason, Akelo Agingu

Administration
 

Project-based, Collaborative STEM Education for High School Students: MIT Beaver Works Summer Institute

The MIT Beaver Works Summer Institute (BWSI) is a rigorous, world-class STEM program for talented rising high-school seniors. In its first year, the program featured an intensive, hands-on, project-based challenge through which teams of students learned how to navigate an autonomous mini-racecar through a complex environment. This program culminated in a final race day when the students put their new skills and knowledge to the test against the clock. In this session, we will provide the details of this new program, its teaching objectives, and its results. We also briefly discuss future directions and opportunities.

Presenters:
John Vivilecchia
Jane Abbott Connor

Computer Science
 

Creative Thinking as Critical Thinking (Part 2)

With a focus on the interrogation of situations in order to create and resolve problems, along with the use of structural tools from fields like logic and cartography, a creative writing course can also be a course in critical thinking. STEM students benefit in multiple ways: the ability to construct and dismantle scenarios translates into math, engineering and science research courses, and the ability to explore and develop identity builds confidence and compassion - necessary tools for innovation.

Presenter:
Dr. Nicole Sarrocco

Humanities
 

Puzzlepalooza: An interactive look at engaging students in learning through puzzles (Part 2)

Are you looking for ways to engage gifted learners? Puzzle hunts provide an opportunity for students to work on problems where solutions or even directions are not immediately evident. The “Puzzle Lords” of Montgomery Blair HS will share their successes and challenges from the eight years of Blair Puzzlepalooza. This will be a hands-on session in which participants will have the opportunity to dive into sample puzzles and work collaboratively on a truly out-of-the-box intellectually stimulating activity.

Presenters:
James Schafer, David Stein, Peter Ostrander & Peter Hammond

Math
 

Flipping Pieces - How to Build Successful Tech-Flipped Activities and Lessons (Part 2)

The research is in … Students enjoy using technology to engage in learning activities both inside and outside the classroom. Using technology successfully to flip classroom instruction does not have to be an all or nothing proposition. Current research suggests that using video micro lectures to offload instruction through homework or out-of-class activities can provide more time in class for student-centered activities, investigations, and the construction of knowledge – “Off-loading instruction” to promote “construction.” Video micro lectures are also a good way to accelerate, differentiate, and to provide open-ended investigations of challenging concepts for our students.

Presenter:
Laura C. McConaughey

Math
 

STEM Innovation & Entrepreneurship Go Hand in Hand (Part 2)

Innovation and entrepreneurship are joined in this interactive and collaborative workshop which focuses on how to turn students’ innovative ideas into entrepreneurial actions. Participants will be given a real problem in the market to solve and work together to create a marketable STEM based solution. Get ready for a fast paced exercise in brainstorming, problem solving, collaboration and out of the box thinking. Your solution will be pitched to our sharks and may the best STEM product win!

Presenters:
Laura Boyd Smidt
Kathryn Cossa

Science and Engineering
 

Transitioning the Transition: Best Practices and Support for Trans Students in a Residential Setting

This session provides an opportunity to discuss theory, best practices, and current practices of institutions surrounding issues that concern transgender students. Approach of residential schools will be foremost, as this setting appears to present the most issues, but all perspectives are welcome. The goal is to walk away with a better understanding of transgender students in a residential setting, how we can better support these students, and current practices being implemented.

Presenter:
Kim Howell

Wellness
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Holistic Admission Application Review in Pharmacy Education

St. Louis College of Pharmacy is implementing a holistic admission application review process for the 2017-18 recruitment cycle, which will allow us to evaluate experiences and attributes beyond the traditional academic metrics. We hope to attract, admit and retain students who have the resilience, persistence and desire to succeed in our rigorous academic program and as healthcare practitioners. This session will demonstrate how the holistic review process was developed; how the process ties into the College’s mission, vision and values; how candidates will be evaluated; and what this process means for students currently in secondary and post-secondary STEM programs.

Presenter:
Elizabeth Keserauskis

Administration
 

Virtual Reality for Educators

This presentation will introduce attendees to Virtual Reality (VR) and its uses within an educational environment. An overview of current hardware and software options will be provided so that educators have a basic understanding of the range (and costs) of VR options at this time. A profile will also be provided of a real-world project created by high school students in partnership with an external partner organization. Finally, the benefits and challenges of working with VR will be covered. A discussion of possible future directions will wrap up the presentation.

Presenter:
Scott Lang

Computer Science
 

A Librarian, Historian and Computer Scientist Walk into a Classroom: Digital Humanities Happens

In a collaborative teaching effort between faculty and staff, a digital humanities experience was created for U.S. History students at the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts. Students created mobile apps featuring artwork from cultural heritage institutions paired with interpretive essays that connected these objects to citizenship rights and responsibilities in the United States. This project required students to use and develop a broad range of skills, including historical knowledge and understanding, locate, evaluate and incorporate information, and technical skills. This session will include the project’s instructional scaffolding, lessons learned, student examples and the future of this project.

Presenters:
Liz Miller
Daniel Moix
Dr. Neil Oatsvall

Humanities
 

Digital Story Assessment in World Languages

Digital Storytelling would seem a perfect tool for world language assessment in a STEM-emphasis school. Many world language teachers are unsure how to begin such a process and digital specialists may not be aware of the constraints of language assessment markers. When media specialists along with world language teachers are able to see the process in a collaborative manner, the task is less daunting.

Presenters:
Bryan Adams
Liz Miller

Humanities
 

Solving Mysteries & Saving Lives: How Scientific Inquiry and Student-Led Learning Enhance the Classroom Experience

How can a newspaper, list of names and map be used to solve a mysterious disease outbreak? In this session, attendees will discover how to incorporate scientific inquiry, writing skills, public speaking, research and data analysis into a hands-on, student-led project that can be implemented in a science or research classroom. In this project students must determine the identity of a mysterious disease that’s infected a fictitious city, then propose how to contain it and prevent future outbreaks. Session will include project design and how the project can be differentiated up or down to meet the diverse needs of learners.

Presenters:
Brittany Joslin, Amanda Micsenyi

Science and Engineering
 

Engineering as a Stealth Language Art

The language arts dimensions of engineering make it a powerful, if stealthy lever for building literacy. Lessons taught through the engineering design process can enhance students’ abilities in language arts like exposition, persuasion, narration, analysis, and description, to name just some.  Find out how the engineering design process can support the development of literacy skills, and vice versa, for native English-speaking students and English-language learners, alike. The session will include both a theoretical discussion of engineering as a stealth language art and several examples of specific programs that make it work.

Presenter:
Eric Iversen

Science and Engineering
 

An Exploration of the Factors that Motivate Gifted and Talented Students from Underrepresented Populations to Engage in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

This presentation will examine the factors that motivate gifted and talented students from underrepresented populations (Black/Latino, low-income and rural students) to engage in STEM at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. In order to continue bridging the gifted and talented URP STEM education and career gaps, the racially and geographically based STEM achievement gaps need to be understood and studied further. Thus, this presentation will examine why certain URP Students have the motivation to engage in STEM, how that motivation is defined and manifested as well as why they decide to pursue STEM.

Presenter:
Adrienne Coleman

Wellness
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm Residential Roundtable Administration
 

Virtual Reality Demos for Educators

Teachers who work in technology and maker space areas will have the opportunity to learn more about hardware and software they may be considering for inclusion in their programs. However, all teachers and administrators could benefit from hearing about the current state of the art in the area of virtual reality. Both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are going to play a role in the future of education and this workshop will prepare them for further investigation of what role these technologies could play in their schools and school districts.

Presenter:
Scott Lang

Computer Science
  Makerspace Panel Science and Engineering
 

Drone Demo

Unmanned Safety Institute® (USI), the leading provider of drone education curriculum and training in the academic and commercial marketplace, is excited to present an educational session and drone flight demo to promote drone education in the classroom environment.  What is commonly referred to as “disruptive technology” creates a fantastic learning tool as industry sectors across the world have begun to adopt the technology to create efficiencies, increase safety, and save money.  USI will present on opportunities and ideas for classroom utilization and highlight industry applications.  Drones even present excellent props for exercises related to math and science standards!

Presenter:
Josh Olds

Science and Engineering
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