ncsss-2015-conference-logo dates
     

Sessions

 

Friday, November 20  |  Saturday, November 21

 Friday, November 20
10:15 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Increasing Student Buoyancy in Classrooms

Student well-being is an important topic in schools today. Student well-being and buoyancy is especially important to challenging school environments like magnet schools because of the relatively high incidence of student depression and student suicides. In my classroom, I studied the effects of teacher interventions on freshmen buoyancy at a challenging high school. The students’ self-assessment data showed that students believe the treatments slightly improved their ability to deal with setbacks and pressure. Teachers will learn about these simple interventions that can be adapted to every classroom to help our population of students.

Eric Zhang
Biology Teacher, Bergen County Academies

Science
 

Traditional to Flipped to Flipped Mastery: The Story of One Advanced Science Course

This session tells the story, three years in the making, of an advanced high school science class as it transitioned from traditional modes of instruction to incorporating aspects of flipped learning to empowering students in a fully blended, mastery-based learning environment. In addition to discussing the practical tools needed to reimagine the delivery of instruction, the concept of student choice within traditional and project-based assessment frameworks will be reviewed.

Todd Crane
Chemistry and Lead Teacher, Bergen County Academies

Science
 

Introductory computing courses can be rigorous and relevant, while still being exciting!

Learn how to present a computer science course that abides by Astrachan’s Law – “Don’t give as a programming assignment something the student could just as easily compute by hand”. Instead, computing courses should include assignments that show the magical quality of software without making the problems harder. Astrachan’s Law inspires us to show off, as programs with impressive output are much more fun and engaging to work on. Examples of assignments that recreate Photoshop, ones that use real-world data sets, and programs that integrate with Twitter, Facebook, and other well-known software programs will be provided and discussed.

Ria Galanos
Computer Science Teacher, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology

Computer Science
 

STEM Competitions at Consortium Schools: Purpose, Significance, and Evaluation (RES)

Academic competitions feature prominently in the extra and co-curricular offerings at Consortium schools. As an Einstein Fellow assigned to the US Department of Energy, I devoted much of my time researching Evaluation of Informal Science Education programs, focusing primarily on competitions. (DOE sponsors the National Science Bowl in order to “encourage students to excel in mathematics and science and to pursue careers in these fields”.) This session will include an overview of national STEM competitions, a discussion of their purposes and significance, and evaluation tools. My own experiences coaching the TJ National Science Bowl team will provide context and illustrations.

Sharon Webb
Mathematics Teacher, TJHSST

Engineering/
Technology
 

Rationale for the definition of the particular solution to an initial value problem involving ordinary differential equations

When solving Initial Value Problems involving separable differential equations it is often necessary to restrict the domain of the explicit solution. Classic examples of such problems will be discussed in an effort to explain the rationale for the definition of these solutions as presented in some textbooks. Other reasons for this definition that are seldom encountered in the literature will also be explored.

James Perna,
Teacher, The Bronx H.S. of Science

Math
 

Enhancing Outcomes for the Twice Exceptional Student

This session will provide specific strategies used both in and out of the classroom to enhance outcomes for all learners by adopting approaches designed to meet the needs of students with unique learning styles, exceptionalities and diverse backgrounds. Classroom pedagogical practices including Socratic seminars, group performance tasks, differentiation of content delivery, co-teaching and executive-functioning supports will be discussed including programmatic elements outside of the core classrooms such as advisory, targeted academic intervention, and partnerships with supporting institutions. These practices will be shared in the context of teacher practice as well as the systems and structures necessary to ensure effective execution.

Lindsey Baumgarten
Assistant Principal, Millennium Brooklyn High School

Raeann McElveen
Literacy & Special Ed. Coach, Millennium Brooklyn High School

Brian Faughnan
Research Dept. Chairperson & Internship Coordinator, Millennium Brooklyn High School

Diversity/Outreach
 

Responding Proactively and Effectively to the Mental Health Needs of Students

More young people with a mental health diagnosis are attending selective and competitive high schools and colleges. College counseling directors report a steady increase in students arriving on campus already on psychiatric medication. The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics are looking at the best ways to provide resources to students dealing with mental health illnesses and prepare them to transition graduates successfully to college. Please join us to hear about our efforts over the past couple of years to create a positive environment related to working with students with mental health illnesses.

Terry Lynch
Vice Chancellor for Student Life, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Counseling
 

Designing Group Work: Increasing Student Engagement

This workshop will equip educators with skills to distinguish cooperative learning from direct instruction; distinguish methods of grouping students; evaluate advantages and disadvantages of group work; distinguish best and worst group work tasks; analyze student and teacher behaviors involved in group work; develop criteria to assess group work; and examine things to consider in designing group work. This workshop will introduce participants to various cooperative learning strategies and techniques that increase overall student participation in lesson development. Some strategies discussed will include Socratic Seminar, Jigsaw Matrix, and Structured Learning Team Group Roles.

Wylie Burgan
Assistant Principal, HSMSE @ CCNY.

Admissions and Programming
11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

High School Invention Factory

The Bronx Science Design Institute was modeled closely on that of Cooper Unions Invention Factory. Run as a 6 week summer program, students work in pairs each day to generate and physically prototype a unique solution to a problem. Students learn the basics of prior art search, use of various rapid prototyping tools and how to submit a provisional patent application. A uniquely different learning environment with take aways for students and teachers alike - Which elements can be brought into a regular classroom?

Benjamin Cornish
Teacher, Bronx High School of Science

Science
 

Apps for Good

Mass Academy of Math and Science at WPI was one of a handful of NCSSS schools that piloted the APPS FOR GOOD curriculum from the UK in the Spring of 2015. In the course, students work together as teams to find real issues they care about and learn to build a mobile, web or social app to solve them. Like professional entrepreneurs, students go through all key aspects of new product development, from idea generation, technical feasibility and programming to product design, deciding on business models and marketing.

Angela Taricco
Computer Science Teacher, Mass Academy of Math and Science

Computer Science
 

Mathematical Modeling and Mathematical Research: Twin Pillars for Creative Mathematical Discovery

Like poetry, the duality of pure and applied mathematics can be described as “an imaginary garden with real toads”- both aspects of mathematics involve creative mathematical discovery. Few of our content rich mathematics courses allow students the time and freedom to truly create due to the large amount of content we cover. At NCSSM, we offer courses in Mathematical Modeling and Research in Mathematics open to post-calculus students. This session will describe each course, present examples of the modeling and research problems used, and give examples of the variety of student work possible.

Daniel Teague
Instructor of Mathematics, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Cheryl Gann
Instructor of Mathematics, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Math
 

Supporting Twice-Exceptional STEM Students in the Writing Process

This presentation will describe the variety of twice-exceptional students (those who are gifted and have learning difficulties, including those who are Limited English Proficient, have IEPs, 504s, etc.) and school-community resources at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, a STEM-focused high school in Northern Virginia. From the Academic Language (ESOL) program and TJ Writing Center to the selected classroom strategies we employ to support our struggling writers, we look forward to sharing with you the successes and challenges we've encountered.

Stephanie Glotfelty
English & ESOL Teacher, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology

Suzette Henry
English teacher, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology

Humanities
 

Best Practices for Closing the Excellence Gap Roundtable

Research shows that economically disadvantaged students are less likely than high-income students to reach advanced levels of academic performance, a concept that has become known as the excellence gap. Unfortunately this excellence gap that starts in elementary school is a contributing factor that keeps some students with the ability to succeed at schools like ours from even being eligible to apply. This roundtable discussion will focus on targeted questions around best practices that help close the excellence gap. Specific topics include data collection, acceleration policies, talent identification, recruitment, and parent-involvement programs through the lens of closing the excellence gap.

Amanda Dyann Baskett
Assistant Director Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

Diversity/Outreach
 

NACAC

Call to Action: STEM College and Career Trends

This session will explore current trends in college admission for STEM majors as well as career options.  We will especially emphasize STEM outreach and opportunities for women and other unrepresented groups in STEM.

Jonathan J. Hoster 
Syracuse University, College of Engineering & Computer Science

Kristin Tichenor
WPI

Counseling
 

Using Competitions as a Method to Incorporate and Design Research Projects for the Classroom

Incorporating scientific research into classrooms is an essential part of STEM education. In this session we will outline how to use research competitions as a framework to design research projects in the classroom. We will begin by providing a brief description of a variety of competitions. Then we will cover the process of selecting a competition that aligns with your class and ties into the course topics. Using real competitions as examples, we will provide guidance in breaking down the project into manageable components for students and will be organized into a timeline that includes due dates and necessary approvals.

Elizabeth Duval
Magnet Science Educator Montgomery Blair High School

Angelique Bosse
Senior Research Coordinator, Montgomery Blair High School

Research
 

Aligning Admissions Factors with Student Success: A Review of the NCSSM Admissions Process

Admission to the NC School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) is a competitive process that considers a range of student factors, including interest in STEM, standardized test scores, and academic performance. NCSSM has recently been conducting a review of the school’s admissions rubric in order to better align the rubric with student success factors and factors that indicate interest in STEM. Attendees of this session will learn more about NCSSM’s admissions process and rubric; discuss findings from the review, including which factors are most predictive of student success; and learn about changes NCSSM is considering to the admissions rubric.

Letita Mason
Director of Admissions, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Geoff Coltrane
Director of Institutional Research and Engagement, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Admissions and Programming
2:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Problem Based Learning: The Gateway to Community Experiences

Problem based learning may be a relatively new concept to some teachers, but for those who are in a STEM program it is a way of life.  The unfortunate issue is that some teachers see PBL as an end to a unit or just one lesson,  but we have found a way to make it so much more.  We have incorporated PBL into all four years of our STEM program and in turn opened many doors for our students to explore their community around them.  Come with us as we explore our PBL journey as a model for all.

Doug Brown    
Teacher, South River High School    

Fran Magiera
Assistant Principal, South River High School        

Deb Lesko
STEM Teacher Specialist, Anne Arundel County Public School

Science
 

Advanced Topics in CS

An increasing number of high school students are completing a first-year Computer Science course such as the AP A-level in Java.  Afterward, a follow-on course such as the old AP AB-level data structures course is also possible.  Then what?  In this session we present a variety of post-AP topics that are not directly linked with USACO, Cyber Patriot, or other established club-level extracurricular contests, but are designed to prepare students for year-long research projects in our Computer Systems Lab.  Topics include: image processing and machine vision, neural networks and learning, simulation and parameter sweeps, and emergent behavior like herd motion.

Shane Torbert
Lab Director, TJHSST

Computer Science
 

Can I Give You a Hand (3-D Printing, Assistive Technology and Engineering)

CAD/3D printing capabilities can support research projects (printing cancer molecule models and turbine prototypes), as well as outreach programs like our our traveling science, where high school students go on the road to local middle schools to teach a “lite” version of CAD, engaging future engineers. Advanced students created a prosthetic hand prototype. Delve into the world of CAD and 3D printing. It will never be the same!

Richard Connell
Visiting Scholar STEM/Engineering, Mass Academy of Math and Science at WPI

Engineering/
Technology
 

Preparing Students to Do Authentic Research from the Beginning - Research Statistics for Incoming Freshmen at TJHSST (RES)

TJ has recently implemented a new Research Statistics course for all in-coming freshman. The course is designed to be much more than a typical introduction to statistics. Rather, statistics is presented as tool to help create, and then analyze thoughtful, authentic experiments and studies with an emphasis on answering questions. In this presentation, we will introduce the course and then lead participants through a number of activities that will provide a discovery of scientific, statistical, and experimental concepts.

Shawn Stickler, Ph.D.
Science and Math Teacher, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology

Math
 

Motivation across Disciplines: Multi-disciplinary Study of Motivation (RES)

This session will present the findings of a school-wide inquiry into student motivation in science, social science, and English. This study was conducted in a specialized, secondary STEM school. Using achievement goal orientation as the motivational framework for the study, we examined 1) differences in students' goal orientations across sophomore, junior and senior years and 2) differences in orientation by gender. Findings suggest that, across disciplines, mastery motivation was significantly higher than performance orientation and that mastery orientation was significantly higher in science courses than in social science and English.

Jay Thomas
Associate Professor of Education Aurora University

Research
 

Using Alternative Interdisciplinary Learning Activities

We will present a review of ASMSA's 20 year history of incorporating special academic interdisciplinary activities which have brought our STEM and Humanities faculties together in a common effort: such as symposiums, reenactments, culture fairs with all students and faculty involved.

Dan McElderry
Spanish / Art Teacher Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts

Jack Wadell, PhD
Physics Teacher Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts

Bryan Adams
World Languages Faculty Member ASMSA

Humanities
 

Developing a Culture of Success

Each year, dozens of students in the IT CTE program at the mostly Hispanic and low-income El Dorado High School in El Paso, TX, obtain industry certifications. Classes are at full capacity, and students even show up on Saturdays to fix computers. Learn the ingredients of what makes this school a recipe for success. In Chicago, five Early College STEM Schools work with local employers year-round to give students real-life business experiences and deepen learning. Gretchen Koch, Executive Director, Workforce Strategies, Creating IT Futures Foundation, shares video, photos and testimonials from El Paso and Chicago, while engaging the other roundtable attendees on how they engage their students from all backgrounds to go further in their STEM studies.

Gretchen Koch 
Creating IT Futures Foundation

Diversity/Outreach
 

STEM for ALL and ALL for STEM! Messaging Matters

Careers in STEM are in demand, and opportunities are available for every student! This session will empower you to effectively communicate to a diverse group of students the breadth of opportunities and pathways in STEM careers. You will be challenged to consider student, parent, and community perception of your school’s “brand” of STEM, and identify areas for improvement to ensure that you are reaching and inspiring every student to consider a future career in STEM.

This session provides research-based messaging to effectively reach and encourage a diverse group of students to consider a future career in STEM.  The session will present an overview of STEM careers, introduce messages that use positive language for talking with students, and connect the messaging with tools, activities, and resources. The session will help educators learn how to talk about the wide range of career options in STEM and enable students to explore STEM career opportunities.  The session provides educators new ways to talk to students about engineering and other STEM-related careers to build their self-efficacy and promote a multitude of career options.

In this session, we will:

1) Increase participant awareness of the most effective messaging for STEM careers through an interactive activity.
2) Improve understanding of the breadth of opportunities and pathways to STEM careers (spanning certifications to graduate-level training)

Objectives

After completing this session, participants will be able to:

• explain the value of STEM careers using positive messaging that is attractive to (and equitable for) a diverse group of students
• advise a diverse group of students into a variety of pathways of opportunity in STEM careers

Meagan Pollock 
Director of Professional Development for the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity

Counseling
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Primary Source Papers: STEM and Common Core Tools to Excite Your Science Classroom

Primary source papers are excellent teaching tools for exciting science learners with actual research data. Reading real studies develops graph and table interpretation skills, understanding experimental design and demonstrates where the information in textbooks actually comes from. To emphasize experimental design these papers can also be approached through backward interpretation. By being presented with actual data, students can be asked to describe how the experiment would have to be set up to gather such data as well as describe the hypothesis the researchers were working under. Differentiation is also achieved through group work and allowing student choice in paper complexity.

Ed Wren
Biology Teacher, Bronx High School of Science

Science
 

Bringing Maker/Hacker/DIY to the Engineering Classroom

This session is an attempt to encourage discussion, networking, and collaboration among engineering classroom teachers. One veteran engineering teacher will present her recent successes (and failures!) in attempting to implement the Maker/Hacker/DIY mentality in her engineering classroom. Other attendees will be encouraged to share and discuss A) What the Maker/Hacker/DIY culture is and why it's relevant, B) What they are currently doing in their engineering classes, and C) Goals and desires for furthering their curriculum.

Alison Earnhart
STEM Educator, Liberal Arts & Science Academy

Engineering/
Technology
 

3D Coordinate Geometry, Vector Math and Computer Game Programming

High school students often have trouble understanding 3D coordinate geometry and vector math. Through designing 3D computer games, students can explore the otherwise abstract math concepts in a fun way!

Wendy Qiu
Math and Computer Science Teacher, Bronx High School of Science

Math
 

Partnership for 21st Century Skills: Innovation in STEM Schools

This one-hour session will be a deep dive into the 21st century skills (Critical Thinking, Communication, Collaboration, and Creativity) necessary to deliver in a STEM for All comprehensive high school. The use of instructional technology will run pervasively throughout the presentation.

Erin DeLuga
Associate Principal of Instruction, Wheeling High School, District 214

Becky Kinnee
Istructional Technology Faciliator, Wheeling High School; District 214

Jen Zorn-Sargeant
English Teacher, Wheeling; District 214

Research
 

Standard Deviations: Creative Writing in an Era of Standardized Testing

Participants will learn how to encourage students to critically question standardized writing-test prompts, and to speak back to those prompts in a variety of genres, even on tests that seem to call exclusively for traditional essays. This presentation uses student test scores, and other data and scholarship, to challenge the monopoly of the traditional essay as the only acceptable mode of response to standardized writing tests, including the SAT. Ultimately, participants will be shown how to use standardized writing tests as opportunities for critical thinking, risk taking, creativity, and empowerment.

Mike Miller
Teacher, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology

Humanities
 

IMSA Allies: “Kids Teaching Kids”

Allies is a youth development service-learning program in which students learn STEM content by serving others. It prepares high school students to deliver inquiry-based, hands-on science, technology, engineering and mathematics activities (STEM) to younger students. Through this kids-teaching-kids model, Allies learn 21st century workforce readiness skills, including best practice collaboration, critical thinking, leadership and communication skills. The Allies Program is a community where students can maintain or acquire rewarding skills and worthwhile relationships through their involvement in STEM. The goal of the program is to provide Allies with an increased understanding of STEM content, STEM majors, and STEM related careers.

Michelle Kolar
Executive Director, Professional Field Services Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Diversity/Outreach
 

NCSSM Academic Advising Pilot Program

The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics is currently in year one of a two year pilot program with the ultimate goal of improving the academic advising experience for students and advisors. Through this process, the school is in the process of defining goals for the advising program, creating responsibilities for both students and advisees, and giving advisors exposure to resources to be better prepared to advisee students. In addition, a goal of the program is to improve student decision-making and cultivate resilience as they prepare for their college experiences.

Terry Lynch
Vice Chancellor for Student Life, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Counseling
 

Opening the Doors for Latinas in STEM Educational Programs and STEM Careers

Roundtable discussion regarding how to best increase talented young Latina participation in STEM education. This timely and thoughtful conversation will explore what's needed to inspire, engage, recruit and retain Latinas in NCSSS educational programs and STEM careers, as well as to connect this discussion at NCSSS with the larger national conversation: policy, practices, research, programs.

José M. Torres, Ph.D.
President, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Diversity/Outreach
 

IS STEM FOR ALL? Perspectives of Black and Latino Students on STEM Motivation

This presentation takes an intricate look at the factors that motivate gifted and talented Black and Latino students to engage in science, technology, engineering and mathematics(STEM). According to the literature, the U.S. workforce could employ as many as 140,000 additional Black and Latino college graduates in STEM fields annually if the gap in college completion by Blacks and Latinos closed to roughly match that of the White and Asian student graduation rates. Thus, the goal of this presentation is to inform administrators, educators, and programs of a 5-step motivation-based program that encourages Black and Latino students to engage in STEM.

Adrienne Coleman, Ed.D.
Multicultural Education Specialist, The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Diversity/Outreach
 Saturday, November 21
8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Teaching the Genome Generation: Personal Genetics and Ethics in the Secondary STEM School Biology Curriculum (Part 1)

'Teaching the Genome Generation' is a guided-inquiry laboratory curriculum and professional development short course that provides high school teachers the content knowledge, teaching strategies, and resources to teach genomics and personalized medicine. The modular curriculum includes molecular genetic analysis of three genes isolated from human samples, use of bioinformatics tools, and discussion of the ethics of genetics research. The workshop will include an overview of the ‘Genome Generation’ curriculum, lab protocols, and materials and a discussion of best practices in teaching molecular genetics in the high school classroom.

Charles Wray, Ph.D.
Director, Courses and Conferences, The Jackson Laboratory

Michael McKernan
Program Director, STEM and Undergraduate Education, The Jackson Laboratory

Science
 

Increase CS Diversity: Make Apps For That! (Part 1)

Empower your students to make mobile applications with Android App Inventor. Whether you want to increase the number and types of students in your existing Computer Science program or start a new one, this session will give you hands-on, project-based ideas that work. Participants need not have previous coding experience! Required: Mac, Windows, or Linux computer with Internet and the ability to install software. A Gmail or Google Applications for Education account and password. Nice to have: Android phone or tablet with cables and the ability to install apps.

Daniel Moix
Computer Science Education Specialist, Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences & ARts

Computer Science
 

The Flipped Classroom: Empowering Differentiation in the Math Classroom (Part 1)

This session will share an instructional model for a flipped class implemented and enhanced over two school years. During the workshop, participants will learn about the approach, try it out, and learn strategies to brainstorm their own flipped class lesson.

Evan Glazer
Principal, TJHSST

Math
 

21st Century Student: Strategies to Prepare Students to Take Over the World (Part 1)

The audience will participate in a series of activities designed to introduce them to academic and personal success strategies that are taught at NCSSM. These strategies are developed through our Residential Education Program which offers students a carefully structured orientation to NCSSM and continues with the students’ selection of electives. The electives include: Public Speaking, Financial Planning, Leadership, Diversity, and strategies for students to market themselves. We aim to support students’ academic success by arming them with strategies that will help their adjustment to our community - both residentially and academically.

Michael Newbauer
Director of Residential Education and Housing, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Kim Howell
Residential Education Instructor, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Diversity/Outreach
 

Shop Class 2015: Teaching Engineering to Urban Youth

The greatest untapped pool of technical talent is in our cities. This program will highlight the importance of teaching hands-on, tools-on project classes with real materials and suggest ways provide students with rich experiences with limited equipment, materials and space. Also, since teaching and inspiring these future engineers requires a sensitivity to their life experiences and home settings, the presenter will suggest ways to assess this and build upon it.

Tom Henning
Physics and Engineering teacher, HS for Math, Science, and Engineering

Engineering/
Technology
 

Building a Math Modeling Program

Over the past four years I have been building a program in Mathematical Modeling at my school in order to successfully compete in the High School Modeling Contest in Mathematics (HiMCM). I would like to share my experiences, instructional materials and strategies as well as provide an opportunity for participants to experience the modeling process. Modeling has provided my students the experience to use the mathematics they have studied in other courses and collaborate with each other in a decision making process.

Thomas J Regele
Math Teacher, Mass Academy of Math and Science at WPI

Math
 

Behavioral and Social Science Research Activities For STEM Students

Independent student research in the STEM-focused high school often focuses on the laboratory sciences, and most schools have strong student research programs in the Biological and Physical Sciences. Success in Behavioral and Social Science is considerably more rare. This workshop offers an overview of how to create a successful social science research program. Topics include preparing students for independent research, teaching statistical computing for research, and incorporating the scientific method into humanities subjects.

Zach Lynn, PhD
Research Teacher & Data Speicalist, Bronx HS of Science

Humanities
 

Creating and Maintaining Positive Communities

Creating a cohesive community where all students and families feel valued and respected is an essential goal for all in education. Social media, cultural competency, and Title IX compliance are all opportunities and challenges that we encounter on a daily basis. We will share an overview of our Student Life Symposium Series which includes a variety of trainings designed to help us create a more inclusive community as well as other programming opportunities. Presenters will share lessons learned/best practices in how we implemented programs in our unique environment. Attendees will be encouraged to share their own best practices/lessons learned.

Jennifer Ashe
Assistant Director of Student Services, Title IX Coordinator NCSSM

Diversity/Outreach
9:35 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.

Teaching the Genome Generation: Personal Genetics and Ethics in the Secondary STEM School (Part 2)

'Teaching the Genome Generation' is a guided-inquiry laboratory curriculum and professional development short course that provides high school teachers the content knowledge, teaching strategies, and resources to teach genomics and personalized medicine. The modular curriculum includes molecular genetic analysis of three genes isolated from human samples, use of bioinformatics tools, and discussion of the ethics of genetics research. The workshop will include an overview of the ‘Genome Generation’ curriculum, lab protocols, and materials and a discussion of best practices in teaching molecular genetics in the high school classroom.

Charles Wray, Ph.D.
Director, Courses and Conferences, The Jackson Laboratory

Michael McKernan
Program Director, STEM and Undergraduate Education, The Jackson Laboratory

Science
 

Increase CS Diversity: Make Apps For That! (Part 2)

Empower your students to make mobile applications with Android App Inventor. Whether you want to increase the number and types of students in your existing Computer Science program or start a new one, this session will give you hands-on, project-based ideas that work. Participants need not have previous coding experience! Required: Mac, Windows, or Linux computer with Internet and the ability to install software. A Gmail or Google Applications for Education account and password. Nice to have: Android phone or tablet with cables and the ability to install apps.

Daniel Moix
Computer Science Education Specialist, Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences & ARts

Computer Science
 

The Flipped Classroom: Empowering Differentiation in the Math Classroom (Part 2)

This session will share an instructional model for a flipped class implemented and enhanced over two school years. During the workshop, participants will learn about the approach, try it out, and learn strategies to brainstorm their own flipped class lesson.

Evan Glazer
Principal, TJHSST

Math
 

21st Century Student: Strategies to Prepare Students to Take Over the World (Part 2)

The audience will participate in a series of activities designed to introduce them to academic and personal success strategies that are taught at NCSSM. These strategies are developed through our Residential Education Program which offers students a carefully structured orientation to NCSSM and continues with the students’ selection of electives. The electives include: Public Speaking, Financial Planning, Leadership, Diversity, and strategies for students to market themselves. We aim to support students’ academic success by arming them with strategies that will help their adjustment to our community - both residentially and academically.

Michael Newbauer
Director of Residential Education and Housing, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Kim Howell
Residential Education Instructor, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Diversity/Outreach
 

A Roundtable discussion of the Use of Research Model Organisms to Design Authentic Laboratory Experiences

Bringing research model organisms into the classroom can provide an authentic experience of scientific research for advanced students. At the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics, the biology courses have used C. elegans, a microscopic worm used in developmental biology research. Students identify specific phenotypes caused by genetic mutations that affect the worms’ appearance or behavior. Students conduct crosses between worm strains to study chromosomal linkage. Students also demonstrate that RNA interference can mimic mutant phenotypes. What ideas do you have for using research model organisms in your classroom? What resources and ideas can we share?

Jennifer Taylor
Biology Instructor, South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Science
 

AP Seminar & Research and the Research Curriculum

This roundtable discussion will be facilitated by teachers from the Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology (RMSST) who are implementing the AP Seminar and Research Courses into their school's existing research curriculum. RMSST has a 15 year history of requiring students to complete three to four years of research course work. Each member of the discussion panel brings a unique perspective to the discussion. Scott Bolen serves as the school’s Research Coordinator. John Hendrix and Kimberly March are Research and English teachers respectively and will be implementing this AP coursework for the first time during the 2015-2016 school year.

Scott Bolen
Research Coordinator, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

John Hendrix
Resaerch Teacher, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

Kimberly Wisnewski
Teacher of 9th Grade English and AP Seminar 2015-2016, Rockdale Magnet School for Science and Technology

Research
 

World Language Education in a STEM School: Man Does Not Live by Math Alone

Spanish teacher, James Torruellas, will guide you through the four courses offered at the Maine School of Science and Mathematics, providing examples of actual thematic units, lesson plans, activities, methods, assessment tools, frustrations, content theoretic underpinning, and pedagogical rationale. We will inter-discuss the current role of ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language) in today’s World Language classroom. WARNING: there will be lots of singing, clapping and random extemporaneous kinesthetic activity during the presentation. If you are shy, you may want to attend a more sedate venue.

James Torruellas
Spanish Teacher, Maine School of Science and Mathematics

Humanities
 

Transitioning from the post-secondary to the high school STEM classroom

A one-hour roundtable discussion of the challenges and rewards that college and university faculty have faced when transitioning to the high school STEM classroom. This will be an open forum designed for post-secondary faculty whose teaching experience has centered on undergraduate education and who are now facing new academic challenges with a novel high school STEM population. Topics for discussion will include (but not be limited to) course preparation, student preparedness, course expectations, and successful techniques for engaging high school stem students.

Glenn Morrow
Instructor Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Counseling
10:40 a.m. - 11:40 p.m.

Teaching the Genome Generation: Personal Genetics and Ethics in the Secondary STEM School Biology Curriculum (Part 3)

'Teaching the Genome Generation' is a guided-inquiry laboratory curriculum and professional development short course that provides high school teachers the content knowledge, teaching strategies, and resources to teach genomics and personalized medicine. The modular curriculum includes molecular genetic analysis of three genes isolated from human samples, use of bioinformatics tools, and discussion of the ethics of genetics research. The workshop will include an overview of the ‘Genome Generation’ curriculum, lab protocols, and materials and a discussion of best practices in teaching molecular genetics in the high school classroom.

Charles Wray, Ph.D.
Director, Courses and Conferences, The Jackson Laboratory

Michael McKernan
Program Director, STEM and Undergraduate Education, The Jackson Laboratory

Science
 

Increase CS Diversity: Make Apps For That! (Part 3)

Empower your students to make mobile applications with Android App Inventor. Whether you want to increase the number and types of students in your existing Computer Science program or start a new one, this session will give you hands-on, project-based ideas that work. Participants need not have previous coding experience! Required: Mac, Windows, or Linux computer with Internet and the ability to install software. A Gmail or Google Applications for Education account and password. Nice to have: Android phone or tablet with cables and the ability to install apps.

Daniel Moix
Computer Science Education Specialist, Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences & ARts

Computer Science
 

The Flipped Classroom: Empowering Differentiation in the Math Classroom (Part 3)

This session will share an instructional model for a flipped class implemented and enhanced over two school years. During the workshop, participants will learn about the approach, try it out, and learn strategies to brainstorm their own flipped class lesson.

Evan Glazer
Principal, TJHSST

Math
 

21st Century Student: Strategies to Prepare Students to Take Over the World (Part 3)

The audience will participate in a series of activities designed to introduce them to academic and personal success strategies that are taught at NCSSM. These strategies are developed through our Residential Education Program which offers students a carefully structured orientation to NCSSM and continues with the students’ selection of electives. The electives include: Public Speaking, Financial Planning, Leadership, Diversity, and strategies for students to market themselves. We aim to support students’ academic success by arming them with strategies that will help their adjustment to our community - both residentially and academically.

Michael Newbauer
Director of Residential Education and Housing, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Kim Howell
Residential Education Instructor, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Diversity/Outreach
 

Mentor Matching Engine for Inquiry Learning

Tour the Mentor Matching Engine (MME), a robust platform available to high school students for conducting research with assistance from online mentors. IMSA, in partnership with the Illinois Science and Technology Coalition and Northwestern University, administer MME as part of the state's R&D Learning Exchange. In addition, discover powerful models of personalized learning and the outstanding results.

Carl Heine
Program Director, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Jose Torres
President Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Research
 

Mining Scientific Literature with ScitC

How can students mine the riches of primary scientific literature with efficiency, confidence and understanding? In this hands-on session, participants will use a professionally developed web -based tool with teacher tested strategies to increase student understanding and use of primary scientific literature. Such access opens the door for greater student innovation, a wider repertoire of experimental strategies, enhanced analytical skills and an improved ability to argue from evidence. Such growth can build student identity as part of the scientific community and appreciation that science is a dynamic process rather than a static collection of facts.

Melissa McCartney, Ph.D.
Associate Editor and Manager of Science in the Classroom, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Andrea Cobb, Ph.D.
Director, Biotechnology and Life Sciences Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology

Research
 

Closing the Achievement Gap and Paving the Route to Success: The NCSSM Summer Bridge Program

In 2013, the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) launched the NCSSM Summer Bridge Program for incoming juniors. An immersive, three-week experience, the Bridge offers a stimulating curriculum in mathematics, humanities, and scientific research that prepares students for the intensity and rigor of NCSSM’s living and learning environment. This session will focus on the selection process, the program’s design, and the unique combination of classroom learning with extracurricular activities that allow students to apply what they have learned. We will also consider what we have learned from our first cohort of students and from the evaluation of the program.

Martha Regalis
Coordinator, NCSSM Summer Bridge Project; Faculty Member and Convener for Curriculum and Assessment, Department of Humanities, NC School of Science and Mathematics

Geoff Coltrane
Director of Institutional Research and Engagement NC School of Science and Mathematics

Diversity/Outreach
 

Character: The Balance to Giftedness

For many educators, students' character is a concern, but they see it as someone else's responsibility to encourage its development. At some schools, colleagues are at a loss as to how to infuse ethical awareness into their school cultures. The goal of this session is to assist with this quandary and to provide resources to support this effort. For gifted students in STEM focused schools, it is important that character education not be neglected as character is the balance to giftedness. Ethics support civility, citizenship, strong communities, and ultimately, better people committed to serving the greater good.

Emilye Mobley
Vice President for Student Development, S.C. Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Counseling
2:40 p.m. - 3:40 p.m.

Inquiry Exploration in a Nutshell: STEAM PBL Investigations Made Simpler

Student-led, project-based learning provides students with the freedom to answer questions that they pose have on topics they are most curious about. Traditionally, we have rewarded students for knowing the answers to questions they never asked. Introduce more student voice and choice into your teaching and learning experiences with a common core-aligned process that engages students in all aspects of STEAM. Participants can expect to receive greater insights and inspiration to adapt this dynamic approach as well as a detailed road map for implementation for all grades levels, K-12. Let go and let learn with my classroom-tested protocols and resources.

Lavonne Hunter
Teacher SYNAPTIK Foundation

Science
 

Teach critical thinking, problem solving and creativity not computer programming

Programming is more than just learning a computer language. It is the process of thinking logically, critically and creatively. It is learning to fail, dealing with details and coping with frustration. It is also an avenue to teach problem solving, teamwork, learning from similar situations and thinking out of the box; life skills that are critical for success in today’s workplace. Teach these skills with projects writing programs for their cell phones, creating their own computer games and artificial intelligence (writing their own chatbot e.g.Siri) Students often use words like “awesome”, “cool” and, occasionally, thanking me personally as they leave.

Cyril Pruszko
Teacher, Eleanor Roosevelt H.S.

Computer Science
 

Enhancing the Calculus Classroom Using Mathematica

The use of Mathematica resources and ideas for visualization of calculus concepts will be presented. Clips from the Wolfram Online Tutorial Video “Mathematica is for Calculus” will be used. Participants will pick a calculus topic and create a mini-lesson presentation of the topic utilizing the Mathematica resources available. Volunteers will present their creation for all participants. Attendees will need a laptop to participate in the workshop.

Sharon Robinson
Math Teacher, Bergen County Academies

Math
 

Student-Driven Learning in a Journal Club Style High School Class

Educators at secondary STEM schools can face a challenge of educating their students at appropriate curricular levels while capturing interest using sufficiently stimulating materials. In this one-hour session, I will discuss a way of meeting this challenge by developing a student-driven, journal-club style class at a high school level.  The session contains a description of how to form and format such a class  (ex. molecular biology), including the choosing, guided reading, highlighting, note taking and presentation of peer-reviewed publications. The benefits of heightened enthusiasm should be enough for most to consider this type of student-driven, and ever changing class.

Patrycja Krakowiak, Ph.D.
Biology Teacher, Arkansas School for Math, Sciences, and the Arts

Research
 

Connecting the STEAM Dots: How to bridge the gap between the Arts and STEM to maximize innovation

More schools are looking to develop and deploy a curriculum that connects STEM and Art classes. However, the implementation of a curriculum where STEM and Art classes intersect in a meaningful way can pose unique challenges. This 1-Hour Education Session will demonstrate how to successfully “connect the dots” between STEM and Art classes in a manner that meets and then exceeds the needs of both types of subjects.

Owen Foster
Chair of the Industrial Design Program, SCAD

Humanities
 

Youth Career Connect NYC: A Citywide Approach to Preparing Students for STEM Careers

In 2014, The U.S. Department of Labor designated $100 million from the H-1B visa program to fund Youth Career Connect (YCC), a federal grant program designed to encourage America’s school districts, higher education, and the workforce to scale up evidence-based high school models that will transform the high school experience for America's youth. The NYC Department of Education was awarded $7 million to design new program models to support high school students pursuing STEM careers over a four year period. In this session, participants will learn more about the framework of the model, best practices, and first year implementation outcomes.

Charisse Taylor
Director, Youth Career Connect NYC NYC Department of Education

Kristen Harris
Director of College Guidance Columbia Secondary School

Admissions and Programming
 

Facilitating Student Internships

The opportunity to complete an internship is a unique and exciting experience for high school students. Participants are paired with mentors in a job shadow environment that allows these students to delve into the fields of their own choosing. These internships provide invaluable information in preparation for college major and career decisions as well as an increased awareness of career, social, and communication skills in a workplace setting. This session will cover 1) requirements for students, 2) supports provided by the school, 3) rubrics and assessments.

Deborah McGann
Instructor, Maine School of Science and Mathematics

Admissions and Programming

If you have questions, need further information or want to secure a sponsorship
or exhibit at 2015 NCSSS Professional Conference, please contact:
Annette M. Suriani, CMP
703-261-6562
annette.suriani@ncsss.org

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